Advertisment

25 Bible Stories About Faith: Inspiring Examples of Trusting God in the Midst of Difficulty

What is faith? According to the writer of Hebrews, faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen (Hebrews 11:1). Faith is believing in God and His promises, even when we cannot see or understand His ways. Faith is trusting in God and His power, even when we face challenges or obstacles. Faith is obeying God and His commands, even when we have to sacrifice or suffer.

Why are Bible stories about faith important?

Bible stories about faith are important because they show us how God has worked in the lives of His people throughout history. They show us how God has fulfilled His promises, delivered His people, performed His miracles, and accomplished His purposes. They show us how God has rewarded those who have trusted and obeyed Him, and how He has disciplined those who have doubted and disobeyed Him.

Advertisment

How can Bible stories about faith inspire us to trust God in the midst of difficulty?

Bible stories about faith can inspire us to trust God in the midst of difficulty because they remind us of who God is and what He can do. They remind us that God is faithful and true, and that He never changes or fails. They remind us that God is sovereign and wise, and that He has a plan and a purpose for everything. They remind us that God is loving and gracious, and that He cares for us and provides for us.

In this post, we will look at 25 Bible stories about faith that can inspire us to trust God in the midst of difficulty. We will divide them into two sections: Old Testament and New Testament. For each story, we will include:

  • A brief summary of the story
  • A key verse from the story
  • A lesson or application from the story

Let’s begin!

25 Bible Stories About Faith

Here are compilations of 25 Bible Stories About Faith with Inspiring Examples of Trusting God in the Midst of Difficulty.

Advertisment

Section 1: Bible stories about faith in the Old Testament

In this section, you’ll get to see stories of faith in the Old Testament, let’s begin.

1. Noah and the ark (Genesis 6-9)

God saw that the wickedness of man was great on the earth, and that every intention of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually. He decided to destroy the earth with a great flood, but He found grace in the eyes of Noah, who was righteous and blameless among his generation. He commanded Noah to build an ark, a large boat, and to take his family and two of every kind of animal into it. Noah did everything that God commanded him. The flood came and covered the whole earth, but Noah and those with him in the ark were saved.

By faith Noah, being warned by God concerning events as yet unseen, in reverent fear constructed an ark for the saving of his household. By this he condemned the world and became an heir of the righteousness that comes by faith. (Hebrews 11:7)

Noah and the ark
A Picture of Noah and the ark

Lesson: Noah’s faith was demonstrated by his obedience to God’s command, even though it seemed illogical and impossible. He trusted God’s word over his own sight or reason. He feared God more than man. He chose to follow God rather than the world. He was rewarded with salvation and righteousness.

2. Abraham and Sarah (Genesis 12-25)

God called Abraham out of his country and his kindred to go to a land that He would show him. He promised to make him a great nation, to bless him, and to make his name great. He also promised to give him a son through his wife Sarah, who was barren. Abraham believed God and obeyed Him, even though he did not know where he was going or when he would receive his son. He faced many trials and tests along the way, such as famine, war, separation from his nephew Lot, deception from Abimelech, conflict with Hagar and Ishmael, and finally the command to sacrifice his son Isaac. Through it all, Abraham trusted God and His promises, even when they seemed impossible or delayed. He became the father of many nations and the friend of God.

And he believed the Lord, and he counted it to him as righteousness. (Genesis 15:6)

Abraham and Sarah
An Image of Abraham and Sarah

Lesson: Abraham’s faith was demonstrated by his willingness to leave his comfort zone and follow God’s call, even though he did not have all the details or guarantees. He trusted God’s character over his own circumstances. He waited patiently for God’s timing over his own desires. He was willing to give up everything for God’s glory over his own interests. He was credited with righteousness and blessed with a son.

3. Moses and the Exodus (Exodus 1-14)

The Israelites were enslaved by the Egyptians for 400 years, and they cried out to God for deliverance. God heard their cry and remembered His covenant with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. He raised up Moses as His servant and sent him to Pharaoh to demand the release of His people. Moses was reluctant and insecure at first, but he obeyed God and confronted Pharaoh with signs and wonders.

Pharaoh hardened his heart and refused to let the Israelites go, so God sent ten plagues on Egypt, each one more severe than the last. The final plague was the death of the firstborn of every household, except for those who had the blood of a lamb on their doorposts. This was the Passover, a sign of God’s salvation and judgment. Pharaoh finally let the Israelites go, but he changed his mind and pursued them with his army.

God parted the Red Sea for the Israelites to cross on dry ground, but He closed it on the Egyptians and drowned them. The Israelites were set free from slavery and saw God’s mighty hand.

By faith Moses, when he was grown up, refused to be called the son of Pharaoh’s daughter, choosing rather to be mistreated with the people of God than to enjoy the fleeting pleasures of sin. He considered the reproach of Christ greater wealth than the treasures of Egypt, for he was looking to the reward. (Hebrews 11:24-26)

Moses and the Exodus
Image of Moses and the Exodus crossing the red sea

Lesson: Moses’ faith was demonstrated by his choice to identify with God’s people rather than with Egypt’s power. He trusted God’s reward over Egypt’s riches. He obeyed God’s voice over his own fears. He followed God’s guidance over his own wisdom. He led God’s people out of bondage and into freedom.

4. David and Goliath (1 Samuel 17)

The Philistines gathered their armies for war against Israel, and they had a champion named Goliath, who was a giant of a man. He defied the armies of Israel and challenged them to send a man to fight him. Whoever won would decide the fate of their nations.

The Israelites were terrified and dismayed by Goliath, and no one dared to face him. David, a young shepherd boy who was sent by his father to bring food to his brothers in the army, heard Goliath’s taunts and was outraged by his blasphemy against God. He volunteered to fight Goliath, even though he was rejected by his brothers and ridiculed by King Saul. He trusted in God and His power, not in human weapons or armor.

He took five smooth stones from a brook and a sling in his hand, and he approached Goliath in the name of the Lord of hosts. He slung a stone at Goliath’s forehead and struck him down. He then took Goliath’s sword and cut off his head. The Philistines fled in panic, and the Israelites pursued them and won a great victory.

And David said to the Philistine, “You come to me with a sword and with a spear and with a javelin, but I come to you in the name of the Lord of hosts, the God of the armies of Israel, whom you have defied.” (1 Samuel 17:45)

A picture of David slinging a stone at Goliath
A picture of David slinging a stone at Goliath

Lesson: David’s faith was demonstrated by his courage to face Goliath, even though he was young and inexperienced. He trusted in God’s name over Goliath’s size. He relied on God’s strength over his own skill. He fought for God’s honor over his own reputation. He defeated Goliath with a stone and a sling.

5. Elijah and the prophets of Baal (1 Kings 18)

King Ahab and his wife Jezebel led Israel into idolatry and worshiped Baal, a false god of the Canaanites. God sent Elijah, His prophet, to confront Ahab and announce a drought on the land as a judgment for their sin. After three years of famine, God told Elijah to go back to Ahab and challenge him to a contest on Mount Carmel. Elijah proposed that they each prepare an altar with a bull as an offering, but not set fire to it. Then they would call on their god, and the god who answered by fire would be the true God. Ahab agreed, and he gathered 450 prophets of Baal on Mount Carmel.

The prophets of Baal went first, and they cried out to Baal from morning till evening, but there was no answer or fire. They even cut themselves with swords and lances, but there was no response or voice or attention from Baal. Elijah mocked them and told them to cry louder or maybe their god was asleep or busy or on a journey. Then Elijah repaired the altar of the Lord that had been broken down by Ahab’s servants. He took twelve stones representing the twelve tribes of Israel.

He arranged the wood and the bull on the altar, and he dug a trench around it. He poured four large jars of water on the altar three times, until the water filled the trench. He prayed to the Lord, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Israel, and asked Him to show Himself as the true God and to turn the people’s hearts back to Him. Then the fire of the Lord fell and consumed the burnt offering and the wood and the stones and the dust and the water in the trench.

The people saw it and fell on their faces and said, “The Lord, he is God; the Lord, he is God.” Elijah commanded them to seize the prophets of Baal and kill them at the brook Kishon. Then he prayed again to God, and He sent rain on the land.

And at the time of the offering of the oblation, Elijah the prophet came near and said, “O Lord, God of Abraham, Isaac, and Israel, let it be known this day that you are God in Israel, and that I am your servant, and that I have done all these things at your word.” (1 Kings 18:36)

Elijah and the prophets of Baal
AN Image of Elijah and the prophets of Baal

Lesson: Elijah’s faith was demonstrated by his boldness to confront Ahab and his prophets, even though he was outnumbered and outmatched. He trusted in God’s word over his own safety. He relied on God’s power over his own resources. He prayed to God with confidence over his own doubts. He proved God’s supremacy over Baal with fire and rain.

Section 2: Bible stories about faith in the New Testament

6. The birth of Jesus (Luke 2)

God sent His Son Jesus into the world to save His people from their sins. He chose a young virgin named Mary to be His mother, and a righteous man named Joseph to be His earthly father. He announced His plan to them through an angel named Gabriel, who told them that Jesus would be conceived by the Holy Spirit and would be called the Son of God.

Mary and Joseph believed God and obeyed Him, even though they faced many difficulties and dangers. They traveled from Nazareth to Bethlehem to register for a census ordered by Caesar Augustus. They could not find a place to stay in Bethlehem, so they had to stay in a stable where animals were kept. There Mary gave birth to Jesus and wrapped Him in swaddling cloths and laid Him in a manger.

There were shepherds nearby who were watching their flocks by night. An angel of the Lord appeared to them and told them the good news of Jesus’ birth. He also told them where to find Him. Then a multitude of heavenly hosts praised God and said, “Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace among those with whom he is pleased.” The shepherds went with haste and found Mary and Joseph and the baby lying in a manger. They worshiped Him and spread the word about Him.

 And Mary said, “Behold, I am the servant of the Lord; let it be to me according to your word.” And the angel departed from her. (Luke 1:38)

The birth of Jesus
A Picture Joseph and Mary Admiring the child Jesus.

Lesson: Mary’s faith was demonstrated by her submission to God’s will, even though it was beyond her understanding or expectation. She trusted in God’s promise over her own reputation or convenience. She obeyed God’s word over her own feelings or fears. She gave birth to Jesus, who is Immanuel, God with us.

7. Jesus’ baptism (Matthew 3:13-17)

Jesus came from Galilee to the Jordan River to be baptized by John the Baptist, who was preaching a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins. John was reluctant to baptize Jesus, because he knew that Jesus was greater than him and had no sin. But Jesus insisted that it was necessary to fulfill all righteousness. So John consented and baptized Jesus. As soon as Jesus came up out of the water, the heavens were opened and he saw

He also saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove and coming to rest on him. And behold, a voice from heaven said, “This is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased.”

And when Jesus was baptized, immediately he went up from the water, and behold, the heavens were opened to him, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove and coming to rest on him. (Matthew 3:16)

Lesson: Jesus’ faith was demonstrated by his obedience to God’s plan, even though it was not required or expected of him. He trusted in God’s righteousness over his own merit. He humbled himself and identified with sinners. He received the Spirit of God and the affirmation of God the Father.

8. Jesus’ miracles (Matthew 8-9)

Jesus performed many miracles during his earthly ministry, which showed his authority and compassion. He healed the sick, cast out demons, calmed the storm, fed the multitudes, raised the dead, and forgave sins. He did these miracles not only to meet the physical and spiritual needs of the people, but also to reveal his identity and mission as the Son of God and the Savior of the world. He also did these miracles to fulfill the prophecies of the Old Testament and to demonstrate the power and presence of the kingdom of God.

When evening came, they brought to him many who were oppressed by demons, and he cast out the spirits with a word and healed all who were sick. This was to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet Isaiah: “He took our illnesses and bore our diseases.” (Matthew 8:16-17)

A picture of Jesus rebuking the wind and the waves
A picture of Jesus rebuking the wind and the waves

Lesson: Jesus’ faith was demonstrated by his dependence on God’s power and will, even though he had his own authority and glory. He trusted in God’s word over his own feelings or opinions. He obeyed God’s command over his own comfort or convenience. He manifested God’s grace and truth through his miracles.

9. Jesus’ death and resurrection (Matthew 26-28)

Jesus was betrayed by one of his disciples, Judas Iscariot, who handed him over to the Jewish leaders for thirty pieces of silver. They accused him of blasphemy and condemned him to death. They delivered him to Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor, who found no fault in him but gave in to the pressure of the crowd and ordered him to be crucified. Jesus was mocked, beaten, scourged, and nailed to a cross between two criminals. He suffered and died for our sins, taking our place and paying our penalty.

He cried out with a loud voice, “It is finished,” and gave up his spirit. He was buried in a tomb by Joseph of Arimathea, a rich man who was a secret disciple of Jesus. On the third day, he rose from the dead, defeating death and sin. He appeared to his disciples and many others, proving that he was alive and that he was the Son of God.

And Jesus cried out again with a loud voice and yielded up his spirit. And behold, the curtain of the temple was torn in two, from top to bottom. And the earth shook, and the rocks were split. (Matthew 27:50-51)

Lesson: Jesus’ faith was demonstrated by his willingness to die for us, even though he was innocent and holy. He trusted in God’s love over his own pain or fear. He submitted to God’s purpose over his own preference or right. He accomplished God’s salvation through his death and resurrection.

10. The early church (Acts 1-12)

After Jesus ascended into heaven, he sent the Holy Spirit to his disciples on the day of Pentecost. They were filled with power and boldness to preach the gospel and make disciples of all nations. They formed a community of believers who devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching, fellowship, breaking of bread, and prayer. They shared their possessions and met each other’s needs.

They performed signs and wonders in Jesus’ name and added to their number daily those who were being saved. They faced persecution from the Jewish leaders and from King Herod, but they rejoiced that they were counted worthy to suffer for Christ’s sake. They prayed fervently for each other and for God’s will to be done. They witnessed God’s protection and deliverance in miraculous ways.

The early church
A picture of Men of The early church

11. Peter walking on water (Matthew 14:22-33)

Jesus sent his disciples ahead of him to cross the Sea of Galilee by boat, while he stayed behind to pray. In the middle of the night, he came to them walking on the water. The disciples were terrified and thought he was a ghost. But Jesus told them to take courage and not be afraid, for it was him. Peter, who was always impulsive and adventurous, asked Jesus to command him to come to him on the water.

Jesus said, “Come.” Peter got out of the boat and walked on the water toward Jesus. But when he saw the wind and the waves, he became afraid and began to sink. He cried out, “Lord, save me.” Jesus immediately reached out his hand and caught him. He said to him, “O you of little faith, why did you doubt?” Then they got into the boat and the wind ceased. The disciples worshiped Jesus and said, “Truly you are the Son of God.”

And Peter answered him, “Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.” He said, “Come.” So Peter got out of the boat and walked on the water and came to Jesus. (Matthew 14:28-29)

Peter walking on water
A picture of Peter walking on water

Lesson: Peter’s faith was demonstrated by his desire to join Jesus on the water, even though it was impossible and dangerous. He trusted in Jesus’ word over his own logic or reason. He stepped out of his comfort zone and took a risk for Jesus. He experienced Jesus’ power and presence through his faith.

12. The woman with the issue of blood (Mark 5:25-34)

A woman who had suffered from a discharge of blood for twelve years came to Jesus, hoping to be healed by him. She had spent all that she had on physicians, but no one could cure her. She heard about Jesus and his miracles, and she believed that if she could touch even his garment, she would be made well. She came behind him in the crowd and touched his cloak. Immediately her flow of blood dried up, and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease.

Jesus felt that power had gone out from him, and he turned around in the crowd and asked, “Who touched my garments?” The woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling and fell down before him and told him the whole truth. Jesus said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.”

And he said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.” (Mark 5:34)

The woman with the issue of blood
A picture of The woman with the issue of blood touching the Jesus garment

Lesson: The woman’s faith was demonstrated by her persistence and courage to come to Jesus, even though she was considered unclean and unworthy. She trusted in Jesus’ power over her own condition or situation. She reached out to Jesus with humility and hope. She received Jesus’ healing and grace through her faith.

13. The centurion’s servant (Matthew 8:5-13)

A centurion, a Roman officer who had authority over a hundred soldiers, came to Jesus, pleading for him to heal his servant who was paralyzed and suffering terribly. Jesus offered to go with him to his house and heal his servant. But the centurion said that he was not worthy to have Jesus under his roof, and that he only needed Jesus to say a word and his servant would be healed.

He said that he understood authority because he himself had soldiers under him who obeyed his commands. He believed that Jesus had authority over sickness and disease as well. When Jesus heard this, he marveled at his faith and said that he had not found such great faith even in Israel. He told him to go home and that it would be done for him as he had believed. And his servant was healed at that very hour.

The centurion replied, “Lord, I am not worthy to have you come under my roof,

The centurion’s servant
Image of The centurion’s servant

14. The Syrophoenician woman (Mark 7:24-30)

Jesus went to the region of Tyre and Sidon, where he met a Gentile woman who had a daughter possessed by an unclean spirit. She begged him to cast out the demon from her daughter. Jesus said to her, “Let the children be fed first, for it is not right to take the children’s bread and throw it to the dogs.” He meant that his primary mission was to the Jews, who were God’s chosen people, and that the Gentiles were considered outsiders and unworthy.

But the woman answered him, “Yes, Lord; yet even the dogs under the table eat the children’s crumbs.” She meant that she was not asking for much, but only for a little mercy from God. Jesus was impressed by her faith and said to her, “For this statement you may go your way; the demon has left your daughter.” And she went home and found her daughter lying in bed and the demon gone.

 But she answered him, “Yes, Lord; yet even the dogs under the table eat the children’s crumbs.” (Mark 7:28)

The Syrophoenician woman
The Syrophoenician woman

Lesson: The woman’s faith was demonstrated by her persistence and humility to come to Jesus, even though she was a Gentile and a woman. She trusted in Jesus’ mercy over her own status or worthiness. She accepted Jesus’ challenge and responded with wisdom and grace. She received Jesus’ healing and favor through her faith.

15. The paralytic and his friends (Mark 2:1-12)

Jesus returned to Capernaum and preached the word of God in a house that was crowded with people. There were four men who brought their friend who was paralyzed to Jesus, hoping that he would heal him. But they could not get near him because of the crowd. So they made an opening in the roof above Jesus and lowered their friend on a mat through it.

When Jesus saw their faith, he said to the paralytic, “Son, your sins are forgiven.” Some of the scribes who were sitting there thought to themselves, “Why does this man speak like that? He is blaspheming! Who can forgive sins but God alone?” Jesus knew their thoughts and said to them, “Why do you question these things in your hearts? Which is easier, to say to the paralytic, ‘Your sins are forgiven,’ or to say, ‘Rise, take up your bed and walk’? But that you may know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins” – he said to the paralytic – “I say to you, rise, pick up your bed, and go home.” And he rose and immediately picked up his bed and went out before them all. They were all amazed and glorified God, saying, “We never saw anything like this!”

And when Jesus saw their faith, he said to the paralytic, “Son, your sins are forgiven.” (Mark 2:5)

The paralytic and his friends
The paralytic and his friends

Lesson: The paralytic’s friends’ faith was demonstrated by their determination and creativity to bring their friend to Jesus, even though they faced obstacles and opposition. They trusted in Jesus’ power over their own limitations or difficulties. They showed their love and care for their friend by doing whatever it took to help him. They witnessed Jesus’ authority and grace through their faith.

16. The widow’s offering (Mark 12:41-44)

Jesus sat opposite the treasury in the temple and watched how people put money into it. Many rich people put in large sums. But a poor widow came and put in two small copper coins, which make a penny. He called his disciples to him and said to them, “Truly, I say to you, this poor widow has put in more than all those who are contributing to the offering box. For they all contributed out of their abundance, but she out of her poverty has put in everything she had, all she had to live on.”

For they all contributed out of their abundance, but she out of her poverty has put in everything she had,

A picture of the widow putting coins in the temple treasury
A picture of the widow putting coins in the temple treasury

17. The Samaritan woman (John 4:1-42)

Jesus traveled through Samaria and stopped at a well near the town of Sychar. He met a Samaritan woman who came to draw water. He asked her for a drink, which surprised her because Jews and Samaritans did not associate with each other. He told her that if she knew who he was, she would ask him for living water, which is the water of eternal life. He revealed to her that he knew everything about her life, including her five previous husbands and her current partner. He also revealed to her that he was the Messiah, the one who was sent by God to save the world.

The woman believed him and left her water jar and went to the town to tell the people about him. Many Samaritans came to see him and hear him, and they also believed in him. They said to the woman, “It is no longer because of what you said that we believe, for we have heard for ourselves, and we know that this is indeed the Savior of the world.”

The woman said to him, “I know that Messiah is coming (he who is called Christ). When he comes, he will tell us all things.” Jesus said to her, “I who speak to you am he.” (John 4:25-26)

The Samaritan woman
a picture of The Samaritan woman

Lesson: The woman’s faith was demonstrated by her openness and curiosity to listen to Jesus, even though she was a Samaritan and a sinner. She trusted in Jesus’ words over her own traditions or opinions. She received Jesus’ living water and became a new person. She shared Jesus’ message and became a witness.

18. The man born blind (John 9:1-41)

Jesus saw a man who was blind from birth and his disciples asked him who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind. Jesus said that neither this man nor his parents sinned, but that the works of God might be displayed in him. He spat on the ground and made mud with his saliva and anointed the man’s eyes with the mud. He told him to go and wash in the pool of Siloam.

The man went and washed and came back seeing. The people who knew him were amazed and confused, and they brought him to the Pharisees, who were the religious leaders of the Jews. The Pharisees questioned him about how he received his sight, but they did not believe him or Jesus. They said that Jesus was a sinner and not from God, because he healed on the Sabbath.

They also questioned his parents, but they were afraid of them and said that he was old enough to speak for himself. They called the man again and told him to give glory to God and not to Jesus, who they said was a sinner. The man said that he did not know whether Jesus was a sinner or not, but one thing he knew: that he was blind but now he sees. He also said that if Jesus was not from God, he could do nothing. The Pharisees were angry and insulted him and cast him out of the synagogue.

Jesus heard that they had cast him out, and he found him and asked him if he believed in the Son of Man, who is another name for the Messiah. The man said that he did not know who he was, but he wanted to believe in him. Jesus said to him, “You have seen him, and it is he who is speaking to you.” The man said, “Lord, I believe,” and he worshiped him.

He answered, “Whether he is a sinner I do not know. One thing I do know, that though I was blind, now I see.” (John 9:25)

The man born blind
A picture of Jesus Healing The man born blind

Lesson: The man’s faith was demonstrated by his obedience and gratitude to Jesus, even though he did not know who he was at first. He trusted in Jesus’ power over his own condition or situation. He testified to Jesus’ work and defended him before his enemies. He recognized Jesus’ identity and worshiped him.

19. The prodigal son (Luke 15:11-32)

Jesus told a parable about a father who had two sons. The younger son asked for his share of the inheritance and left his father’s house to go to a far country. There he wasted his money on reckless living and ended up in poverty and hunger.

He hired himself out to a citizen of that country, who sent him to feed pigs. He longed to eat even the pods that the pigs ate, but no one gave him anything. He came to his senses and decided to go back to his father and ask for forgiveness and mercy. He rehearsed what he would say: “Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you. I am no longer worthy to be called your son.

Treat me as one of your hired servants.” He arose and went to his father. But while he was still a long way off, his father saw him and felt compassion for him. He ran and embraced him and kissed him. The son said to him what he had planned, but the father did not listen. He called his servants and told them to bring the best robe and put it on him, and to put a ring on his hand and shoes on his feet. He also told them to kill the fattened calf and make a feast, for he said, “This my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found.” And they began to celebrate.

The older son, who was in the field, heard the music and dancing and asked what was happening. He was told that his brother had come back and that his father had killed the fattened calf for him. He was angry and refused to go in. His father came out and entreated him, but he answered, “Look, these many years I have served you, and I never disobeyed your command, yet you never gave me a young goat, that I might celebrate with my friends.

But when this son of yours came, who has devoured your property with prostitutes, you killed the fattened calf for him!” The father said to him, “Son, you are always with me, and all that is mine is yours. It was fitting to celebrate and be glad, for this your brother was dead, and is alive; he was lost, and is found.”

And he arose and came to his father. But while he was still a long way off, his father saw him and felt compassion, and ran and embraced him and kissed him. (Luke 15:20)

The prodigal son
The prodigal son returned home to the father

Lesson: The younger son’s faith was demonstrated by his repentance and humility to return to his father, even though he had sinned against him and wasted his inheritance. He trusted in his father’s love over his own guilt or shame. He confessed his sin and asked for mercy. He received his father’s forgiveness and restoration through his faith.

20. The thief on the cross (Luke 23:39-43)

Summary: Jesus was crucified between two criminals, who were also sentenced to death by the Roman authorities. One of the criminals railed at Jesus and said, “Are you not the Christ? Save yourself and us!” But the other criminal rebuked him and confessed that they deserved their punishment, but Jesus was innocent. He then asked Jesus to remember him when he came into his kingdom. Jesus replied that he would be with him in paradise that day.

The lesson of this story is that it is never too late to repent and believe in Jesus. Even in his last moments, the thief recognized his sin and trusted in Jesus as his Savior. He received God’s grace and forgiveness, and the promise of eternal life. This story shows us that salvation is not based on our works, but on God’s mercy and love. It also encourages us to follow the example of the repentant thief, who humbled himself before God and honored Jesus as his Lord.

The thief on the cross
The thief on the cross

21. The conversion of Saul (Acts 9:1-19)

Saul was a zealous Pharisee who persecuted the followers of Jesus, arresting them and putting them to death. He obtained letters from the high priest to go to Damascus and bring back any Christians he found there to Jerusalem. As he was on his way, he suddenly saw a bright light from heaven that blinded him. He fell to the ground and heard a voice saying to him, “Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting me?” He asked, “Who are you, Lord?” The voice said, “I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting. But rise and enter the city, and you will be told what you are to do.” The men who were with him were speechless, hearing the voice but seeing no one. Saul got up and opened his eyes, but he could see nothing. They led him by the hand and brought him to Damascus. He was without sight for three days, and he neither ate nor drank.

There was a disciple in Damascus named Ananias, whom the Lord called in a vision. He told him to go to the house of Judas and look for a man named Saul of Tarsus, who was praying. He also told him that Saul had seen a vision of a man named Ananias laying his hands on him and restoring his sight.

Ananias was afraid and said to the Lord, “Lord, I have heard from many about this man, how much evil he has done to your saints in Jerusalem. And here he has authority from the chief priests to bind all who call on your name.” But the Lord said to him, “Go, for he is a chosen instrument of mine to carry my name before the Gentiles and kings and the children of Israel. For I will show him how much he must suffer for the sake of my name.” Ananias obeyed the Lord and went to Saul. He laid his hands on him and said, “Brother Saul, the Lord Jesus who appeared to you on the road by which you came has sent me so that you may regain your sight and be filled with the Holy Spirit.” And immediately something like scales fell from his eyes, and he regained his sight. He rose and was baptized. And he took food and was strengthened.

And falling to the ground, he heard a voice saying to him, “Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting me?” And he said, “Who are you, Lord?” And he said, “I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting.” (Acts 9:4-5)

The conversion of Saul
The conversion of Saul

Lesson: Saul’s faith was demonstrated by his radical transformation from a persecutor to a preacher of Jesus. He trusted in Jesus’ identity over his own ideology or reputation. He obeyed Jesus’ call over his own agenda or ambition. He received Jesus’ forgiveness and grace through his faith.

22. The Philippian jailer (Acts 16:25-34)

Paul and Silas were missionaries who preached the gospel in Philippi, a Roman colony in Macedonia. They cast out a spirit of divination from a slave girl who made money for her owners by fortune-telling. Her owners were angry and dragged them before the magistrates, accusing them of disturbing the city and teaching unlawful customs. The crowd joined in attacking them, and the magistrates ordered them to be beaten with rods and thrown into prison. They were put in the inner prison and their feet were fastened in stocks.

About midnight, Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns to God, and the prisoners were listening to them. Suddenly there was a great earthquake, so that the foundations of the prison were shaken. And immediately all the doors were opened, and everyone’s bonds were unfastened. When the jailer woke up and saw the prison doors open, he drew his sword and was about to kill himself, supposing that the prisoners had escaped. But Paul cried out with a loud voice, “Do not harm yourself, for we are all here.” And the jailer called for lights and rushed in, and trembling with fear he fell down before Paul and Silas.

Then he brought them out and said, “Sirs, what must I do to be saved?” And they said, “Believe in the Lord Jesus, and you will be saved, you and your household.” And they spoke the word of the Lord to him and to all who were in his house. And he took them the same hour of the night and washed their wounds; and he was baptized at once, he and all his family. Then he brought them up into his house and set food before them. And he rejoiced along with his entire household that he had believed in God.

Then he brought them out and said, “Sirs, what must I do to be saved?” And they said, “Believe in the Lord Jesus, and you will be saved, you and your household.” (Acts 16:30-31)

The Philippian jailer
A picture of The Philippian jailer

Lesson: The jailer’s faith was demonstrated by his repentance and confession of Jesus, even though he was a pagan and a prisoner. He trusted in Jesus’ salvation over his own despair or duty. He obeyed Jesus’ word over his own fear or doubt. He received Jesus’ forgiveness and joy through his faith.

23. The Ethiopian eunuch (Acts 8:26-40)

Philip was an evangelist who preached the gospel in Samaria with great success. An angel of the Lord told him to go south to the road that goes down from Jerusalem to Gaza. He obeyed and went. There he met an Ethiopian eunuch, who was a court official of Candace, queen of the Ethiopians. He was in charge of all her treasure and had come to Jerusalem to worship. He was returning home in his chariot and reading aloud from the prophet Isaiah. The Spirit told Philip to go over and join him.

Philip ran to him and heard him reading from Isaiah 53:7-8, which speaks of the suffering servant who was led like a lamb to the slaughter and whose life was taken away. Philip asked him if he understood what he was reading. He said that he did not, and asked Philip to explain it to him. Philip opened his mouth and beginning with this Scripture he told him the good news about Jesus.

As they were going along the road they came to some water. The eunuch said, “See, here is water! What prevents me from being baptized?” Philip said, “If you believe with all your heart, you may.” And he replied, “I believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God.” And he commanded the chariot to stop, and they both went down into the water, Philip and the eunuch, and he baptized him. And when they came up out of the water, the Spirit of the Lord carried Philip away, and the eunuch saw him no more, but went on his way rejoicing.

And Philip said, “If you believe with all your heart, you may.” And he replied, “I believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God.” (Acts 8:37)

The Ethiopian eunuch
The Ethiopian eunuch

Lesson: The eunuch’s faith was demonstrated by his hunger and humility to learn from God’s word, even though he was a foreigner and an outsider. He trusted in Jesus’ fulfillment over his own understanding or tradition. He responded to Jesus’ invitation over his own status or convenience. He received Jesus’ baptism and joy through his faith.

24. The woman with the alabaster flask (Mark 14:3-9)

Jesus was in Bethany at the house of Simon the leper, reclining at table with his disciples. A woman came with an alabaster flask of very expensive ointment of pure nard. She broke the flask and poured it over his head. Some of those who were there said to themselves indignantly, but why did she waste the ointment? For this ointment could have been sold for more than three hundred denarii and given to the poor.” And they scolded her. But Jesus said, “Leave her alone.

Why do you trouble her? She has done a beautiful thing to me. For you always have the poor with you, and whenever you want, you can do good for them. But you will not always have me. She has done what she could; she has anointed my body beforehand for burial. And truly, I say to you, wherever the gospel is proclaimed in the whole world, what she has done will be told in memory of her.”

She has done what she could; she has anointed my body beforehand for burial. (Mark 14:8)

The woman with the alabaster flask
A picture of The woman with the alabaster flask

Lesson: The woman’s faith was demonstrated by her devotion and generosity to Jesus, even though she was criticized and misunderstood. She trusted in Jesus’ worth over her own wealth or reputation. She gave Jesus her best and most precious gift. She honored Jesus’ death and resurrection through her faith.

25. The thief on the cross (Luke 23:39-43)

Jesus was crucified between two criminals, one on his right and one on his left. The people and the rulers mocked him and challenged him to save himself and come down from the cross. The soldiers also mocked him and offered him sour wine. One of the criminals who were hanged railed at him, saying, “Are you not the Christ? Save yourself and us!” But the other rebuked him, saying, “Do you not fear God, since you are under the same sentence of condemnation? And we indeed justly, for we are receiving the due reward of our deeds; but this man has done nothing wrong.” And he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.” And Jesus said to him, “Truly, I say to you, today you will be with me in paradise.”

And he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.” And Jesus said to him, “Truly, I say to you, today you will be with me in paradise.” (Luke 23:42-43)

Lesson: The thief’s faith was demonstrated by his repentance and confession of Jesus, even though he was dying and hopeless. He trusted in Jesus’ kingdom over his own fate or circumstance. He acknowledged Jesus’ innocence and authority. He received Jesus’ promise and mercy through his faith.

My words of Conclusion

We have seen that the Bible is full of stories about faith that can inspire us to trust God in the midst of difficulty. These stories show us how God has revealed Himself and His plan through His Son Jesus Christ, who is the author and finisher of our faith. They also show us how God has empowered and transformed His people by His Spirit, who is the helper and counselor of our faith.

How can we apply the lessons of these Bible stories about faith to our own lives? We can do this by:

  • Reading and studying God’s Word regularly and diligently (2 Timothy 2:15)
  • Praying and asking God for wisdom and guidance (James 1:5)
  • Obeying and following God’s commands and will (John 14:15)
  • Sharing and witnessing God’s love and grace (Matthew 28:19-20)
  • Growing and maturing in our faith (2 Peter 3:18)

I hope this blog post has been helpful and inspiring for you. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to share them below. Thank you for reading and God bless you! 😊

Advertisment

Leave a Comment